Award-Winning Natural Nutrition

At Paleo Ridge, we have little interest in being anything but the very best. It is by offering your beloved pets the best and most healthy diet available that we guarantee the future of our award-winning (link), family business. Part of this process is endeavouring to stay at the cutting-edge of science and research, ensuring we continue to develop a growing range of the most natural, nutritious meals for your pets. 

Our ethos is very much based upon what a dog would have eaten naturally in the wild as the very basics of animal husbandry dictate that animals are more healthy when fed a fresh, species appropriate diet, one that they have evolved over countless millennia to eat. In the case of the dog, this a diet of raw meat, organ and bone.

If you have any questions regarding any of the above information, please contact us and we'll be happy to have one of our expert nutritionists answer any questions.


The Dog as a Carnivore

While many make loose comparisons of the dog to the wolf, an animal the dog hasn't been related to for perhaps 100,000 years, there is a far more appropriate comparison to make, and that is to the dog's brother the dingo. The dingo was a domestic dog introduced to the Australian outback by Asian travellers somewhere between 2-4,000 years ago. They are still so closely related to the dog that they readily interbreed. Study after study shows the dingo is a total carnivore, eating 98% animal matter (Gill et al. 1964, Fleming 2001, Corbett 2004).

wild-dingo

(Picture above, a Wild Dingo, the closest living relative to the domesticated dog)

The anatomy experts agree (Feldhamer 2003, NRC 2006, Akers and Denbow 2008) that the dog is a carnivore. On the inside, many facets of the dog's anatomy convince canine nutritionists the dog is a meat-eating carnivore. Just some of these features include:

  • hinged-jaw, no sideways movement
  • meat shearing, bone-crunching dental arcade
  • no salivary amylase for the digestion of carbohydrates
  • taste receptors geared for meat 
  • wide gullet and expandable, acidic stomach
  • short, fast, acidic digestive tract
  • gut flora ill equipped for plant fibre digestion
  • their ability to make carbs from protein and fat on a constant cycle and thus zero need of carbohydrates in their diet, the very definition of a meat eater

 

What is 80:10:10?

Our research has lead us to formulate our current range of complete based on the “80-10-10” principle which in plain terms means 80% meat, 10% bone and 10% organ, that being the very approximate ratio you would find these categories in the average small prey animal, such as a rabbit or rodent. We find this ratio keeps dogs performing at their best. We now have a customer base of many thousands of happy customers spanning many years, all testifying to the adequacy of our meals. You don't get to number one (link) with anything less.

We stay up to date with all research and will continue to develop new recipes and meals that are researched and proven to give a dog their full requirements of each important nutrient, allowing them to thrive and be as healthy as possible. That said, it is important to highlight at this point that not everyone feeds their dog in just this way. Many add in on top their dinner left-overs. Others pick up some bargains in their local supermarket to pad out their mixes. This is all perfectly fine to do, often very beneficial, ensuring even greater variation in the dog's diet. Others still include some vegetable and fruit material on a near daily basis (either blended raw or cooked), on the basis that some evidence points towards the fact that some dogs may have eaten some of this material in the wild at certain times. Indeed, there are a variety of studies that support that stance (https://dogsfirst.ie/feeding-vegetables-to-dogs/). We feel that, as long as the quality is as good as it can possibly be, any and all of these methods are perfectly fine.

Naturally Better

The secret to Paleo Ridge’s quality is our relentless commitment to only sourcing the best ingredients. We search far and wide to find farms which align with our core values of high welfare, ethical rearing and sustainable farming, and visit them constantly to ensure we can guarantee this quality. In addition to this, our commitment to only sourcing high welfare and ethically reared meats, means our raw dog food is not only free of chemical pollutant but naturally more nutrient dense. There is simply no comparison to naturally-fed animals.

tychris

(Picture above, left is Chris Jones, Head of supply Chain, right is Tyler Daly, Managing Director visiting one of our venison suppliers in Scotland)

 


Please find below some more information about some of the meats we use. 

Organic Chicken 

Certified organic poultry producers are subject to a strict production regime based on sound organic principles that cover the whole farming system. These methods protect our fragile environment; maintaining a respect and concern for the welfare of our animals through strictly controlled natural rearing conditions and the use of high quality certified organic feedstuffs. One benefit is while free-range and barn-reared farmed birds live only 35-52 days, organic birds live almost twice as long at around 81 plus days. The result is a wholesome and nutritious product with no antibiotic residues or GMOs. One study found that organic chicken contained 38% more heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids (link). Organic chicken is also an excellent source of niacin and very good source of protein and selenium. It is also a good source of vitamin B6, phosphorus, choline, pantothenic acid and vitamin B12.

Organic-Chicken 


Grass-fed Beef

As well as being the most ethical and high welfare method of rearing cattle, grass fed cattle also have a number of important differences from intensively reared beef:

 

  • Monounsaturated fat: Grass-fed beef contains much less monounsaturated fat than grain-fed beef
  • Omega 3: Grass-fed beef contains up to five times as much omega-3. This results in a more balanced ratio of omega 6:3 fats (3:1), which is less inflammatory to the body
  • CLA: Grass-fed beef contains about twice as much Conjugated Linoleic Acid as grain-fed beef. This polyunsaturated fatty acid is associated with a several health benefits including muscle building (and reduction of storage fat) as well as anti-inflammatory properties and likely fighting cancer.
  • Vitamin A: Grass-fed beef contains carotenoid precursors to vitamin A, such as beta-carotene.
  • Vitamin E: This is a vital antioxidant that resides in your cell membranes and protects them from oxidation.

 

Grass-fed beef also tends to be richer in other antioxidants such as vitamin B12, B3 and B6. It’s also an excellent source of highly bioavailable iron, selenium and zinc, creatine, carnosine, folate B9, choline, copper, Vit A and many more. You’ll also find more iron, sodium, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in greater quantities in grass-fed meat. The beef contains more thiamine and riboflavin, too. All of these minerals help keep your dog’s body healthy and feeling great.

Cattle-pic 


Grass fed Lamb

As with beef, grass-fed lamb is a significant source of omega-3 fats, and the ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fats is far better in grass-fed lamb, which is good news from an inflammatory point of view. Simply put, beef and sheep are designed to eat grass, not grain and other artificially modified food. Grass is what’s best for them. And it’s without question, better for us to eat meat from animals naturally reared on grass.

Grass-fed lamb is an excellent source of CLA. Furthermore, about 40% of the fat in grass-fed lamb comes from oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat. This type of fat has been associated with decreased risk of heart disease. It is also a very good source of selenium and a good source of zinc. Healthy intake of these minerals is a protective factor against oxidative stress because they are co-factors in important antioxidant enzyme systems.


 

Free Range Turkey

Our turkey meat comes from turkeys that are free to roam outside in the fresh air on real actual ground. It's a delight to see them in a more normal habitat though they make a surprising amount of noise. Free range turkey meat is a good source of iron, zinc, potassium and phosphorus. It is also a source of vitamin B6 and niacin, which are both essential for your dog’s energy production.  The meat is low-GI and can help keep insulin levels stable, which is great news for diabetic sufferers. Turkey contains a lot of the amino acid tryptophan, which produces serotonin and plays an important role in strengthening the immune system. It is also a source of selenium, which is essential for thyroid hormone metabolism, boosting immunity and acts as an antioxidant.

FR-turkey



High Welfare Duck

We only source our duck from high welfare, free to roam farms. Duck meat is abundant in a variety of essential vitamins and minerals such as heme iron, selenium, B vitamins, zinc, potassium and phosphorous. B vitamins  and iron are central to energy production, helping to prevent anaemia in the animal, a condition that can cause fatigue and dizziness. The skin of free to roam duck contains about 1/3 saturated fat and 2/3 monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat.



 

Outdoor Reared Pork

We at Paleo Ridge love pigs. Intelligent animals, they deserve some time nosing around outside. We only source pork from high welfare, outdoor reared farms. Pork is a nutrient-rich food. It is a good source of potassium, riboflavin and zinc, and is an excellent source of vitamin B6, thiamine, phosphorus, niacin and protein. Pork is naturally low in sodium, too.



Vitamins and Minerals Present in the Components of an 80-10-10 Raw Diet

 

Vitamin A (Retinol): chicken, pork, egg, salmon, haddock, sardines, sprat, mackerel, herring, liver, kidney, brain, tuna

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine): liver, rabbit, chicken, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): liver, heart, kidney, rabbit, chicken, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, venison, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Vitamin B3 (Niacin): rabbit, chicken, turkey, duck, pork, venison, lamb, goat, egg, beef, salmon,  haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring, tuna

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid): liver, heart, kidney, rabbit, chicken, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, venison, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine): liver, heart, kidney, rabbit, chicken, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, venison, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid): liver, rabbit, chicken, venison, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Vitamin B12 (cobalt/choline): liver, heart, kidney, rabbit, chicken, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, venison, egg, beef, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Vitamin C: liver, kidney, heart, fish

Vitamin D: egg, sardine, liver, kidney, salmon, tuna

Vitamin E:  egg, haddock, sprat, mackerel, herring, sardine, kidney, liver, brain

Vitamin K: egg, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring,  liver

Calcium: rabbit, chicken, venison, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine

Copper: chicken, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, venison, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine Mackerel, sprats, herring,

Iodine: salmon, haddock, mackerel, sprats, herring, sardine, egg

Iron: rabbit, chicken, duck, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, venison, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine

Magnesium: rabbit, chicken, turkey, duck, pork, venison goat, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Manganese: rabbit, chicken, turkey, duck, pork, goat, venison, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, halibut, sardine, mackerel, sprats, herring

Phosphorus: rabbit, beef, venison, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Potassium: rabbit, chicken, turkey, beef, venison, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

Selenium: rabbit, chicken, duck, venison turkey, pork, lamb, goat, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine, sprats, herring, mackerel

Zinc: rabbit, chicken, venison, turkey, duck, pork, lamb, goat, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine, sprat, mackerel, herring

*If a specific organ is not listed, the nutrient is present in the meat of the animal listed*

 

Omega 3 fatty acids: salmon, haddock, sardine, mackerel, sprats, herring, venison turkey, chicken, duck, beef, pork, venison, lamb, goat 

Omega 6 fatty acid: salmon, haddock, sardine, sprat, herring, mackerel, venison turkey, chicken, duck, beef, pork, venison, lamb, goat 

Amino Acids

Essential amino acids

Your dog needs a total of 22 amino acids, the building blocks the dog uses to make muscles, hair, skin and enzymes. Twelve of them are synthesized in their bodies; the other ten must be provided by diet.

What is an Amino acid?

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Proteins are made up of chains of amino acids. There are non-essential ones—called that because they can be produced in the liver—and essential (or indispensable) ones that must be provided through the diet. A high protein diet for your dog is critical.

Arginine: turkey, beef, lamb, pork, chicken, goat, venison

Histidine: beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, goat, fish, eggs

Isoleucine: beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, goat, fish, eggs

Leucine: beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, goat, fish, eggs

Lysine: beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, goat, fish, eggs

Methionine: beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, goat, fish, eggs

Phenylalanine: beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, goat, fish, eggs

Threonine: beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, liver, fish,

Tryptophan: turkey, chicken, rabbit, lamb, beef, goat, eggs

Valine: beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, eggs

If you have any questions regarding any of the above information, please contact us and we'll be happy to have one of our nutritionists answer any questions.

 

 References

 

Akers, R. M. and Denbow, D. M. (2008). Anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. Oxford: Blackwell.

Corbett, L. (2004). "Dingo". Canids: Foxes, Wolves, Jackals and Dogs. International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.

Feldhamer, G. A. (2003). Mammology: Adaptation, diversity, and ecology, 2nd Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill. O’Reece, W. (2004). Dukes’ physiology of domestic animals (12th ed.). Ithaca, NY: Comstock Publishing.

Fleming, F., Corbett, L., Harden, R. and Thomson, P. (2001). Managing the impacts of dingoes and other wild dogs. Canberra, Australia: National Heritage Trust, Bureau of Rural Sciences.

Gill, J., Hoffmannowa, H. and Piekarz, R. (1964). Studies on digestive physiology in the wolf, dingo, and jackal. II. Digestive ability of the pancreas, duodenum and salivary glands and size of the alimentary tract and weight of internal organs. Acta Physiologica, 15(1): 137–148.

National Research Council (NRC) (2006). Nutrient requirement of dogs and cats. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

 

 

 

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